Cambridge Tree Project
Cambridge Tree Project

Evergreens

 

Available by request

Hemlock, Canadian (Tsuga canadensis) Native

A most graceful evergreen, softer appearing than spruces and pines...requires good garden soil and will grow in complete shade or in sun...can be sheared into a hedge or left alone it will reach 50 ft. tall and 30 ft. wide in the home landsape...two trees planted in shade at Nickolay middle school have averaged 12 inches of annual growth.

 

Pine, Eastern White (Pinus strobis) Native

Fast growing and beautiful evergreen that exudes personality as it ages...this tree will eventually need a lot of space, specimens over 100 ft. high are somewhat common up north; and the highest in Wisconsin is over 150 ft...in landscape conditions they reach 60 ft. tall and 30 ft. wide...easy to grow in most soils provided they're well drained.

 

Spruce, Black Hills (Picea glauca densata)

An offshoot of our native white spruce that's acclimated to tougher conditions...as the result, it's a great choice for newer subdivisions...greater branch density (see above) than most evergreens provides a more formal character...cones are much smaller than other spruces, reaching only one to two inches long...known to be slower growing than Norway spruce, they reach 40 ft. tall and 20 ft. wide in most landscapes.

 

 

Spuce, Colorado Blue (Picea pungens)

Formal, attention-grabbing evergreen that tolerates exposed, windswept areas...slower growing, adding 12 inches of growth annually...two to four inch cones are smaller than those of Norway spruce...reaches 30 ft. tall and 15 ft. wide as a lawn tree.

 

 

Spruce, Norway (Picea abies)

Fast growing, beautiful and adaptable evergreen...easy to grow in any well-drained soil...withstands cold (to -30) and windswept, exposed areas...dark green, lustrous needles that keep their color even during the worst winters...large cones are colored an ornamental red when young (pictured above) maturing to light brown, four to six inches in length...reaches 50 ft. tall and 25 ft. wide at at a pace of 18 inches annually.

 

 

 

 

All profits support the planting and establishment of trees in Cambridge

 

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