Cambridge Tree Project
Cambridge Tree Project

Our Vision for Cambridge:

Create and sustain a mature tree canopy throughout Village

Many of Cambridge's largest trees are silver maples nearing the end of their life. We also have many mature ash trees that will soon succumb to the Emerald Ash Borer - now well established in the Veteran's Park area of Cambridge. Homeowners benefit from a tree canopy by having measurably lower utility bills and reduced need to water, not to mention the beauty and increased property values that a canopy brings to any neighborhood.

Tree canopy examples:

Locate legacy trees in strategic locations

We've planted purple beeches throughout Cambridge: in front of the middle and high schools and one behind the old red school. These trees will grow to several hundred years old and reach massive sizes. Following picture taken at Notre Dame campus with hundred year old purple beeches on either side.

Feature trees/shrubs that add color during the summer months

Nearly all of our woody plants flower during the spring. To balance this, we've planted summer-flowering shrubs and trees. Examples include oak leaf hydrangea, golden rain tree and Japanese scholar tree.

Oak Leaf Hydrangea:

Golden Rain Tree:
Chinese Scholar Tree:
Plant good 'climbers' in our parks

Protect forestry assets

Streets can be narrowed and sidewalks made to go around expanding tree trunks:

The following basswood tree declined quickly after a street widening. It later had to removed at taxpayer expense. A Study by the University of Minnesota found that trees are over two times more likely to be blown over in severe weather when its roots are compromised by sidewalk replacement, a practice that doesn't cause nearly as much damage as this street widening did:
A narrowed street provides additional room for tree root establishment:
Street corner in process of being narrowed:
Excessively wide residential street that is out of scale with neighborhood:

Profits go directly toward planting trees in Cambridge and Rockdale common areas.

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Contact us: infoatcambridgetreeproject.org